Gloucestershire

Severn Cross

Flag Type:  County Flag
Flag Date:  March 2008
Flag Designer:  Jeremy Bentall
Adoption Route:  High Sheriff
UK Design Code:  UNKG7413
Aspect Ratio:  3:5
Pantone® Colours:  Green 360, Cream 7402, Blue 300
Certification:  Flag Institute Chief Vexillologist, Graham Bartram
Notes: 

The ‘Severn Cross’ flag was the winner of a competition organized by the High Sheriff of Gloucestershire, Jonathan Carr.

14 Responses to Gloucestershire

  1. Rod Gay 25 April 2014 at 8:32 pm #

    Having lived in Gloucestershire all my life (born Stow on the Wold, now in Cheltenham) I can’t but regard this flag as an insipid, wishy-washy design that does nothing for the majesty and gritty reality of my home county. No surprise that the so called High Sheriff should choose for us. No democrat he!
    OK he can retain the cross and the green of the fields and the blue of the sky (the Severn is always a muddy brown) but there should be black for the coal of the Forest of Dean instead of the wan light brown, which does no justice to the rich colour of Cotswold stone. Other counties often include an emblem in their design. There are several possibilities for Gloucestershire. Think sheep.
    Gloucestershire is not just about holiday homes and royal residencies. It has a long and proud history which this flag does little to celebrate.

    • Greg 24 April 2017 at 10:32 pm #

      Agree that something should be done about the cream colour.
      Otherwise a lovely simpleness that captures the true colours of the Cotswolds (even if not the river) but we get your vibe

  2. Jeremy Bentall 6 January 2015 at 12:12 pm #

    I have only just come across this site, hence the delay in responding. Forgive my bias, however, I did design the flag and resent the “insipid” remark. Flags need to have a simple design – no more than 2 to 3 colours. A diagonal cross seemed too much like the Scottish flag, hence the horizontal blue cross. I believe the colours work well – unfortunately, the shade of green on my original design is not what you often see represented on reproductions! I believe the design is vibrant and attractive. It does not have to represent aspects of the county’s history/culture – Gloucestershire does not have a monopoly on sheep! It’s simply a symbol for Gloucesterhire folk to “rally round” which to me is most important. As for the addition of an emblem, the diocese do transpose their coat of arms and it was suggested the Gloucs symbol could be placed centrally. I believe the cost of doing so was a major stumbling block? I don’t think the flag has been well publicised. This may be in part to its undemocratic selection. Using local radio to organise a vote to choose from 3 or 4 designs would have been more inclusive.

    • James 22 April 2017 at 10:29 pm #

      Completely agree. How many of the other county/shore flags are a literal representation of those they identify? The previous comments are clearly made someone whose pre-school ‘collage’ didn’t make the long-list!!!

  3. Alex White 14 September 2015 at 9:04 am #

    I am Gloucestershire born, and I have owned this flag for many years, flying at home, at events and whilst on holiday. I really do like it. It stands out I feel that its straightforward and simplistic design works. I do also feel that the beige could be a richer colour, however I still embrace it for what it is and stands for. I do also agree that it should be more widly publicised ad used by, dare I say, the local council and the Sherff who endorsed it!

  4. Roland Smoker 8 January 2017 at 2:06 pm #

    What day of the month of March was this flag registered?

  5. Connor Stewart 24 October 2017 at 2:26 am #

    I fly this regularly from a flag pole in my Bristol garden (north of the Avon, of course). A lovely, very distinctive design to represent my county and one of the two counties of my city.

    • A. Rustic 14 January 2018 at 10:19 pm #

      I’m afraid to inform you that Bristol hasn’t been a part of Gloucestershire (or Somerset) since 1373 – presuming you aren’t located in South Gloucestershire, which is. Gloucestershire County Cricket Club is however strangely based in Bristol and uses the coat of arms of Bristol!

      • Connor Stewart 7 June 2018 at 11:04 pm #

        Not true. Bristol was granted a county corporation in 1373 (essentially that time’s “borough” status, allowing it to be free of those times’ equivalent of a county council), but Bristol has never been its own county historically (and still isn’t, from what governments have repeatedly said since the 1970s about the various new civic areas not changing the historic counties). County corporate status was granted to various other towns and cities in England, including York, Canterbury, Gloucester, Nottingham and Exeter. No one would argue that those towns/cities are not located in their respective counties, but some do today in the case of Bristol.

        I believe the misunderstanding of the status comes from the days of Avon County Council and the pining for a return of Bristol’s administrative independence. Misreadings of history and the want to “gin-up” Bristol’s case saw “county of a city” (a honorific that the other towns above shared) extended to be “not part of Gloucestershire and/or Somerset”.

        Case in point, the 1911 edition of Encyclopaedia Britannica sees no contradiction in saying “BRISTOL, a city, county of a city, municipal, county and parliamentary borough, and seaport of England, chiefly in Gloucestershire but partly in Somersetshire, 118½ m. W. of London.”
        https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/1911_Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica/Bristol_%28England%29

        So, no, I will continue to recognise my city’s two counties, and pay no mind to ever changing political boundaries.

  6. Mr Jones 14 January 2018 at 11:45 pm #

    Whilst I admire and appreciate Mr Bentall for rolling up his sleeves and finally creating a flag for Gloucestershire after many years without one, I’m sorry to write I find it difficult to feel an affinity and affection for this particular flag after almost 10 years.

    Without being as scathing as the previous comments, I think a good county flag is rooted in heraldry which has stood the test of time long before county flags were created. For better or for worse, Gloucestershire has usually been represented (at least since Victorian times) by the chevrons of De Clare or some variation of this as shown in the arms of Gloucester – see the county council arms, the Gloucestershire FA, Wilts & Gloucestershire Railway, flags of the Royal Gloucestershire Yeomanry Cavalry, the Bristol & Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, numerous depictions in county parish churches, town and village signs such as at Chipping Campden or the Wills Memorial Building in Bristol for examples. Red and yellow are are a great colour pairing and chevrons look visually striking – such as in the arms and flag of Glamorgan. Red and yellow match the Wessex colours of other West Country flags such as Somerset and Dorset, perhaps the county council arms could be slightly differenced into a flag like our neighbours in Somerset did with theirs?

    Sadly, the “Severn as blue, fields as green, Cotswold stone as yellow” is unfamiliar as all three can appear brown even on a good day. There may be a kernel of truth with previous comments that this is too romanticised rather than reality. With all due respect to Mr Bentall for his efforts and without any forelock tugging to historic Norman overlords, I will continue to view the historic arms as more representative of the county.

  7. Frank Melhuish 23 March 2018 at 12:22 pm #

    i have just been given an “old” Gloucestershire flag containing tied up sheep, chevrons and horseshoes,i think that it is very nice,red and yellow go well and the odd bit of green stands out.I cannot find a picture of this flag as yet but it is early days. I have no objections to the present flag which i also fly from time to time but i do object to those who fly the White Ensign without authority..

  8. Seb Gibson 13 May 2018 at 1:57 pm #

    I don’t really like it. I feel the flag of Gloucestershire should represent the ancient heraldry and history of the county, not some washed out colours in a simplistic cross. I’d personally look towards the scheme of the Gloucester coat of arms – an interesting design that is unlike many others in the country. Maybe a little something to show where the county has come from, something representative of Wessex and Mercia?

    Just my thoughts anyway

  9. Ben 31 May 2018 at 3:30 pm #

    Anywhere north of the avon can be in gloucestershire even if it’s within the city of bristol,shirehampton, sea mills henbury Westbury on trym, st george,stapleton,horfield, fishponds,all once part of barton regis in gloucestershire.

  10. Connor Stewart 9 June 2018 at 5:21 pm #

    @A. Rustic
    Not true. Bristol was granted a county corporation in 1373 (essentially that time’s “borough” status, allowing it to be free of those times’ equivalent of a county council), but Bristol has never been its own county historically (and still isn’t, from what governments have repeatedly said since the 1970s about the various new civic areas not changing the historic counties). County corporate status was granted to various other towns and cities in England, including York, Canterbury, Gloucester, Nottingham and Exeter. No one would argue that those towns/cities are not located in their respective counties, but some do today in the case of Bristol.

    I believe the misunderstanding of the status comes from the days of Avon County Council and the pining for a return of Bristol’s administrative independence. Misreadings of history and the want to “gin-up” Bristol’s case saw “county of a city” (a honorific that the other towns above shared) extended to be “not part of Gloucestershire and/or Somerset”.

    Case in point, the 1911 edition of Encyclopaedia Britannica sees no contradiction in saying “BRISTOL, a city, county of a city, municipal, county and parliamentary borough, and seaport of England, chiefly in Gloucestershire but partly in Somersetshire, 118½ m. W. of London.”

    So, no, I will continue to recognise my city’s two counties, and pay no mind to ever changing political boundaries.

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