Flag Institute Adopts New Flag & Emblem

On the 18th November 2016, at the Flag Institute’s Council Meeting in Birmingham, the Institute formally adopted a new flag and emblem.

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The Old Emblem of The Flag Institute

The previous flag and emblem had been designed by the former Director of the Flag Institute, the late Dr William Crampton, in 1971, when the Institute was founded. The design commemorated the founding date, St George’s Day, and incorporated a ‘V’ shape to represent vexillology.

Over the years since its foundation, the Flag Institute’s role has changed. From a small group of flag enthusiasts it has grown into a larger organization, the UK’s national flag charity. As a UK organization, the emphasis on the emblem of England, the St George’s Cross, had become an issue when the Institute worked in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. So a year ago it was decided to create a new flag and logo, one that represented our UK role in flags.

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The New Emblem of The Flag Institute

The design, as finally adopted at the Council Meeting, is based on the lower quarter of the Union Flag, in a stylised representation that expresses forward movement. It was designed by the Chief Vexillologist, Graham Bartram, and the Community Vexillologist, Philip Tibbetts.

There will be a transition period where materials could bear either the old or new emblem, until stock of old-brand material is exhausted. You will see the new logo in use on this website.

 

4 Responses to Flag Institute Adopts New Flag & Emblem

  1. John Yates 24 November 2016 at 9:15 pm #

    Oh dear! It looks all wrong! Should have used the fourth quarter and not the third!
    I have already turned down a design like this on the advice by a senior F I member

    • Arlo James Barnes 29 November 2016 at 5:46 pm #

      What is preferrable about the fourth quarter?

      It seems the intention here was to have also a red arrow pointing to the upper right (or upper left if seen from the other side of the flag, I suppose; upper flyward, perhaps?) to signify “forward movement” (in the sense of progress).

  2. Gus Harris-Reid 9 December 2016 at 10:17 pm #

    Did anyone actually complain about this? If they’re going to object to the St George’s Cross being prominent the Flag Institute’s emblem, they’re going to object to it being prominent in the Union Flag itself.

    The way it’s used in the old emblem/flag is more of a nordic cross anyway.

    The new emblem’s ok as a logo, but it won’t work as a flag if it’s stylised like that. I’m sure you’re all aware of the guidelines for good flag design (e.g. simple geometric shapes, easy to draw from memory).

    Please keep the old flag, at least as an official symbol if not as the Institute’s logo!

    • Gus Harris-Reid 9 December 2016 at 10:52 pm #

      I think the old flag is a great design; It’s unique, is already reminiscent of the Union Flag in terms of colours and shapes, and has a story behind it.

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